Make your own free website on Tripod.com
« February 2007 »
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28
You are not logged in. Log in
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
Building Defects
Building Services
Business
Capital Facilities
Construction Industry
Energy Use
Government Policies
Natural Disasters
Public Facilities
The Environment
Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
RSS Feed
View Profile
Letters
Friday, 5 January 2007
Mercury Danger?
Topic: The Environment

THE EDITOR, Sir:

I have recently been informed that mercury can be emitted in the production of cement. These emissions pollute bodies of water and, as a potent neurotoxin, it can harm developing brains.

Switzerland, at present, requires the control of such emissions from their cement plants and this month the U.S.A.'s Environmental Protection Agency has mandated that mercury emissions be controlled in kilns built as of December 2005, and dust containing mercury be controlled from all other kilns.

It would, therefore, be in the public interest to know if there has ever been any monitoring of mercury emissions from local kilns and, more importantly, are new kilns now under construction able to control mercury emissions?

I am, etc.,

PAUL HAY

Managing partner

PAUL HAY Consultants

Kingston 10


Posted by phcjam at 6:53 PM EST
Updated: Tuesday, 15 March 2011 7:47 PM EDT
Monday, 17 July 2006
New Building for Parliament
Topic: Public Facilities
 

THE EDITOR, Sir:

With regard to the current debate about constructing a new Parliament building, it may prove informative to consider a similar case involving the construction of the new Australian parliament building completed 18 years ago.

Australia's provisional Parlia-ment House was built in 1927 in their then new national capital Canberra and was intended to last only 50 years. After 38 years in the facility, a joint select committee of parliament was constituted to consider the need for a new building. Five years later, in 1970, this committee recommended that the planning, design and construction of the new building should be overseen by a joint standing committee.

In 1977, the joint standing committee recommended that the new parliament building be completed for occupation in 1988 (75 years after the completion of the provisional parliament building) to coincide with the bicentenary of European settlement of Australia.

It took them two years to establish a comprehensive set of requirements for the building and a statutory body was established and charged as project managers for the design and construction of this building alone. The whole process took 23 years from constitution of the joint select committee to occupation of the new parliament building.

Granted our Parliament would be much smaller, but the neccessary planning, design and eventual construction will most likely take longer than a single parliamentary term, and maybe we need a specific event to commemorate, such as the 50th year of independence.

I am, etc.,

PAUL HAY

Managing partner

PAUL HAY Capital Projects

15a Cassia Park Road

Kingston 10

 


Posted by phcjam at 12:01 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 23 April 2011 2:00 PM EDT
Thursday, 27 October 2005
Using Natural Ventilation
Topic: Energy Use

THE EDITOR, Sir:

PLEASE ALLOW me to respond to a letter, published on Saturday, October 22, 2005, entitled 'Wasteful designs'. First, the author, Paul Ward, has raised many valid points and is to be commended, along with any other like-minded individuals. The use of natural ventilation and lighting would reduce energy consumed in buildings. Air-conditioning and electric lights use approximately 77 per cent of electricity consumed in large buildings: 56 per cent for cooling and 21 per cent for lighting.

Buildings can still be designed for natural ventilation and lighting. In fact, there are several small offices in Jamaica that are naturally ventilated, including some belonging to architects: one, I am told, uses air-conditioning only when cooling is otherwise impossible. As the lecturer of building services at the Caribbean School of Architecture, University of Technology, I can also inform you that our future architects are first taught to design using natural resources before they are taught about electric lighting and air-conditioning. So, 'the technology of the past' is still very relevant and achievable.

But, natural ventilation is generally impractical in large compact buildings and use of natural light is limited to rooms with windows. Also, large buildings designed to use natural ventilation and lighting are of necessity long: which presents problems regarding earthquake resistance. So, they tend to be more expensive. Those interested in these types of buildings should therefore expect higher construction costs in order to reduce operation costs due to their use of electricity.

I am, etc.,

PAUL HAY

phcadmin@phcjamaica.com

Managing Partner

Paul Hay Consultants

15a Cassia Park Road

Kingston 10


Posted by phcjam at 7:35 PM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 15 March 2011 7:43 PM EDT
Friday, 30 September 2005
Boost to Jamaica's Energy Efficiency Possible
Topic: Energy Use

Dear Editor, 

In the September 23, 2005 edition of your Financial Gleaner, Raymond Forrest's article 'We need to boost our Energy Efficiency' concludes with the statement: "... we have a major problem that requires conservation measures and change in current behaviour".  I am in full agreement.  We need to appreciate that oil is a non-renewable resource and needs to be treated accordingly.

 

But, changes are not only limited to transportation.  In the article 'Jamaica on the wrong side of the Energy Spectrum: Directions for the Future, part I', published in the January 27, 2005 edition of the Gleaner, Dr. Cezley Sampson noted the 23.5 percent of Jamaica's oil imports is used for transportation, but 25 percent is used in the generation of electricity, as Jamaica's energy demand is almost totally supplied by imported fuel.

 

Change in the design and operation of our buildings can therefore make significant contributions toward boosting energy efficiency.  Over 10 years go, a study undertaken in Thialand revealed that annual consumption of energy in stores and hotels could be reduced by up to 56 and 51 percent respectively.  The implementation of the conservation measures would even pay for themselves within one or two years.  A comparable local study revealed that annual consumption in our typical offices could be reduced by 30 - 36 percent, if these buildings complied with the Energy Efficiency Building Code (EEBC-94), in which case, the payback period was between 1.2 and 2.6 years.

 

Towards this end, the Jamaican Institute of Engineers is to be commended for including energy-efficiency as one aspect of their effort to revise the National Building Code.  Policymakers, design professionals, real estate developers, building owners and operators therefore need to take stock, and effect changes for the good of the nation and to improve returns on their investments.

 

Paul Hay BA(Arch.)
Managing Partner
PAUL HAY Capital Projects

Caribbean Capital Projects Management


P. O. Box 3367
Constant Springs, Kgn. 8
Jamaica, W.I.

tel: 1 (876) 756-0631
cel: 1 (876) 324-4274
fax: 1 (876) 756-0631

e-mail: paul.hay@phcjam.com
skype name: phcjam
twitter: www.twitter.com/phcjam
profile: http://www.linkedin.com/company/paul-hay-capital-projects

web: http://www.phcjam.com 


Posted by phcjam at 12:01 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 10 March 2012 5:10 PM EST
Wednesday, 20 July 2005
Taking Hurricanes Seriously
Topic: Natural Disasters
THE EDITOR, Sir:

AS THE nation rejoices at the passing of another hurricane we should not forget the complacency of some people regarding hurricane precautions - whether in disregarding evacuation notices or simply carrying on with business as usual.

There seems to be a mis-conception that hurricanes less than Category 5 in magnitude are just nuisances and pose no threat; which is far from the truth. In fact, the category system is not only based on a hurricane's wind speed, but also the extent of damage consistent within a specific band of wind speeds. Possible damage to buildings is as follows:

CATEGORY 1: Well-built, light-weight buildings not secured to the ground are likely to be damaged.

CATEGORY 2: Major damage may occur to similar buildings. Damage to roofing material, windows and doors may occur on other buildings.

CATEGORY 3: Small buildings may be structurally damaged.

CATEGORY 4: Complete failure may occur to roofs of small buildings. Otherwise, extensive damage may occur to roofing material, windows and doors.

CATEGORY 5: Considerable damage may occur to roofs; severe damage to windows and doors; and small buildings may be overturned or blown away.

Of course, this does not include the associated effect of landslides, mudslides, flooding, storm surges, falling trees or other debris. So, the potential for destruction exists with every hurricane and should not be taken lightly. It is much better for us to err on the the side of caution and be safe, than be sorry for not doing so.

I am, etc.,

PAUL HAY

phcadmin@phcjamaica.com

Managing Partner

PAUL HAY Consultants

15a Cassia Park Road

Kingston 10


Posted by phcjam at 6:46 PM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 15 March 2011 8:07 PM EDT
Monday, 28 June 2004
Concerning Energy Policy
Topic: Government Policies

28 June 2004 

THE EDITOR, Sir:

Having just read Dennie Quill's article 'Big Bucks at the Pumps', in the June 25, 2004 edition of The Gleaner, please allow me to comment on the 'comprehensive national policy' for the construction industry.

First, Jamaica has had an Energy Efficiency Building Code since 1995. To quote the foreword to this document: "It is the culmination of a joint effort of the Jamaica Bureau of Standards, the Ministry of Public Utilities, Mining and Energy and Jamaican Architects and Engineers to develop the building standards which are appropriate to our own climate as well as to our building designs and construction practices."

ISSUES

This document addresses such issues as walls, roofs, openings, lighting (including daylighting), electric power, etc. Second, our architects and engineers were invited to seminars on its use. Graduates of the Caribbean School of Architecture at the University of Technology have been trained in its use since it was published. Personnel within the Parish Councils have also received training. The only thing lacking is the will to implement it.

The code was originally intended for voluntary compliance and I am aware that the Government had intentions of making it compulsory (hence the training of the Parish Council personnel). But the policy at present is a mystery.

I am, etc.,

PAUL HAY

phcadmin@phcjamaica.com

Managing Partner

PAUL HAY Consultants

15a Cassia Park Road

Kingston 10


Posted by phcjam at 7:28 PM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 15 March 2011 7:55 PM EDT

Newer | Latest | Older